Carrie Alexander

495C Unit Plans

 

CREATIVE REVISING OF WRITTEN TEXTS AND A TRANSFER OF THOSE TEXTS IN TO ORAL PRESENTATIONS

 

CREATED FOR SENIOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE C3NTER FOR ACADEMICS AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (CAAT) AT THE STATE COLLEGE AREA HIGH SCHOOL.

Editorís Note (:

VIRTUALLY ALL OF THESE LESSON PLANS ARE A FINAL COLLECTION OF WHAT WAS DONE IN CLASSóMOST OF THEM WERE PLANNED TO BE DIFFERENT, BUT THE COURSE OF THE CLASS PERIOD PROVED A NEED TO CHANGE THEM. I REALIZE THAT A LOT OF THE WRITING IS IN FRAGMENTS, BUT THAT IS HOW I WRITE OUT MY IDEAS AS I USE THE WRITTEN LESSON PLAN AS A PARTIAL GUIDE IN REFERENCE TO WHAT IíM DOING.

 

This is an outline of my lesson plansóthe five that I used to introduce new concepts are in full format; the remaining days were used for more workshop type activities.

 

OVERALL UNIT GOALS/OBJECTIVES

My overall goal for this unit was for my students to better utilize their writing to clearly convey what they know to a specific audience. My objectives were as following:

Students will have a better grasp on descriptive words, transitions, and the concept of writing fluently

Students will learn from media instruction how to become better writers/presenters

Students will use group work to understand the relationship of an instructor/presenter to an audience.

 

By the end of the three weeks, we were able to accomplish the set objectives and ideals for the unit.

 

DAY ONE: DESCRIPTIVE INTRODUCTIONS

 

OBJECTIVES: IMPROVE STUDENT SKILLS IN EXPANDING INTRODUCTIONS THAT WILL SHOW PERSONAL INTEREST AND THAT WILL CAPTURE AUDIENCE ATTENTION.

 

MATERIALS: Video clips from four television presentations which utilize their introductions to capture audience attention: NIGHTLINE, LETTERMAN, AND TWO CLIPS FROM THE CONCURRENT NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

 

CLASS OPENER: Talk to the students about what I will be doing with them over the course of the next three weeks. Be honest about the work they need to do on their presentations before the final copy is to be turned in. Emphasize how important last three weeks areóimplement 50 participation point class grade. I am impressed with your content knowledgeómany of you fail to get audience attention right off the bat. YOUR INTRODUCTION WILL MAKE OR BRAK YOU! GOING INTO THIS PHASSE OF THE PROJECT, YOU MSUT BE GEARED TOWARDS CATCHING AUDIENCE INTEREST.

ACTIVITY: Break class into four ìthinking groupsîóno particular order, just rows. Give them a particular TV clip to be responsible for, and tell them to note what it is about that which gets their interest right away (i.e. current events, controversial issues, loud music, etc.) Show students the videoóshould take about 25 minutes in whole. At end of time, go through the groups and make a list on the board of the different techniques. Go over the fact that the best highlights that the shows have to offer will be what is shown up frontóask them why that is. If something doesnít grab the TV audience attention right away, the channel will be changed. Relate it to the fact that if their papers and presentations do not get attention up front, reader will be disinterested.

 

ASSESSMENT: I was surprised how well this workedóit was a good change of pace for the students. The kids came up with a great listóI left it on the board and wrote it downóthis would serve as a tool for both myself and the students in giving them ways to develop their introductions.

 

DAY TWO: CREATIVE OUTBURST

OBJECTIVE: FOR STUDENTS TO BECOME MORE FAMILIAR WITH DESCRIPTIVE WORDS AND TO APPLY THE SKILLS WE HAVE REVIEWED OVER THE PAST TWO DAYS TO THEIR PROJECTS.

MATERIALS: BAG FULL OF ODDS AND ENDS FROM MY APARTMENT---------CANDY BARS FOR THE WINNERS

 

ACTIVITY: Divide the class at random into two teams. Let them pick a team name collectively. Go over the game: one person will come up, see an object, and have 30 seconds to describe it to their teamóthey cannot say any word that has part of the objectís name within itóif so, they will lose a point. The winners will earn a prize.

ASSESSMENT: This activity was very successful. These kids got into it right away, and I saw that they all had very good descriptive abilities. Halfway through the game, I realized that the task was too easy, so I changed the rules. I scrambled for new items within my co-opís desk, and had the studentís select one member from their team for a ìlightening round.î That person had one minute to come up, see an item, return to their team and describe it as best they could. When it was solved, that person had to dome up and receive another item to describe. Whoever got through the most items in one minute would win.

DAYS THREE THROUGH FIVE INVOLVED WORKSHOPS THAT TOOK WHAT WE HAD REVIEWED, AND APPLYING THEM TO THE PROJECTSóTHE STUDENTS HAD TO ID FOR ME THREE PLACES WITHIN THEIR INTRODUCTIONS WHERE THEY COULD ADD DESCRIPTIONS.

 

DAY SIX: PLAGIARISM

OBJECTIVE: ALERT CLASS TO HOW DANGEROUS PLAGIARISM AND TAKING CREDIT FOR ANOTHERíS WORK/IDEAS IS; GET THEM TO DOCUMENT THEIR SOURCES.

 

MATERIALS: ìMILLI VANILLI EXPOSEDî ARTICLE

FACTS ON PLAGIARISM

EXCERPTS FROM MLA HANDBOOK ON DOCUMENTING SOURCES

 

CLASS OPENER: Mini-lecture on plagiarism. Ask the class if any of them remember Milli Vanilliówho were they? What are they known for? Talk about how taking credit for anotherís work ruined them. Hand out article on Milli Vanilli and introduce concept of plagiarism. Read excerpts from The Anatomy of Plagiarism. Go over the definition, penalties for the act, and a case study. Hand out biblio. Page and go over how to cite sources.

 

ACTIVITY: Class had the remainder of class time to go over their projects and locate at least three places where they needed to cite anotherís work. I only required three, because it was late in the assignment for them to do an in depth recap of the whole projectógetting them to do anything of the sort was a stretch enough.

 

ASSESSMENT: This was a very effective lessonóthey were all really attentive when I went over the penalties of plagiarism. They werenít as against locating places in their paper to cite texts as I thought they would beóa couple of the guys said all of the info. Was from their heads, and I believed them. For the most part, everybody found something, even if it was a couple of questions they asked somebody, to add.

 

DAYS SEVEN THROUGH TEN WERE SPENT IN THE COMPUTER LAB, WORKING ON BIBLIOGRAPHIES, AND SCANNING INFORMATION FOR THEIR FINAL WRITTEN PROJECTS.

 

DAY ELEVEN: 3 ìCíSî OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

OBJECTIVE: GIVE STUDENTS PRACTICE AND HARD EXAMOPLES OF TRANSFERRING WRITTEN TEXTUAL INFORMATION INTO ORAL PRESENTATIONS.

 

MATERIALS: MOVIE CLIPS OF ACTORíS GIVING VARIED INFORMATIONAL PRESENTATIONS: RENAISSANCE MAN, PEE-WEEíS BIG ADVENTURE, JURASSIC PARK, AND TOMMY BOY

 

CLASS OPENER: Mini lesson on the 3 Císótoday I want to focus on what I call the basic 3 Cís of vocal performance. Any ideas? ñAsk the class. CLARITY, COHESIVENESS, AND CONSISTENCY. One of your main objectives needs to be that your audience understands what you will be talking aboutóthey are selfish; what can you offer them? Clearly define up front what you will be going on about.óItís almost like you are selling a product or solving some kind of mystery. You are presenting facts in a way that is interesting.

 

ACTIVITY: Show four movie clips, again divide students into four rows, and assign each one a movie clip. Their task is to note what positive and negative things the actorís do in giving their presentations. After this they will have one minute to talk amongst themselves and pool their ideas-óMyself, my partner and my co-op worked with them. Later, we will list each film on the board, and the actorís positive and negative traits. We will talk about what was effective, what was not, and why.

 

ASSESSMENT: Today was greatóthese kids really are attentive to media presentationsóthe variety of presentations brought a lot of ideas, and I write them on the board in order to get the kids their own copies. The groups even argued a little on what did and didnít work for the actorísónow, I want them to concentrate on how they can adopt their own interpretation of the 3 "C'sî in their projects.

 

DAY TWELVE: TRANSFERRING WRITTEN TEXT TO ORAL PRESENTATION

 

OBJECTIVE: GIVE STUDENTS PRACTICE IN TRANSFERRING WRITTEN TEXTS INTO ORAL PRESENTATIONS

 

MATERIALS: HANDOUT ON THE THREE CíS

READERíS DIGEST ìHOW TOî ARTICLES

 

CLASS OPENER: Have desks arranged in small groups when the kids come into the room. Guide them to a particular group when they enter the room. Go over the clips we watched yesterday, and give them the handout, which incorporates them all into the 3 Cís.

 

 

ACTIVITY: Give the studentís, in their groups, a copy of three ìhow toî articles from the readerís Digest How Do They Do That book. Have the students together read their article, pick out the main points, and be ready to give them to the class. Go through each group, and write the main points of the articles on the board. Then, ask the class as a whole how they could break that information down into categories. These categories will then serve as a good format to work from in breaking a written text down into an oral presentation.

 

ASSESSMENT: The change in classroom set up with the desks in small groups created total havoc to start the class. I wanted to separate them into groups, but just getting them to sit was a task and a half. Most of them worked well on the task, and a couple of kids even got on the ones who werenít participating to help them out. They did an amazing job with breaking the final information into categories, and I was really impressed. I went over what they had done and how that relates to their own projectsóthey all looked at me, realizing a little bit of what they had accomplished. (

 

DAY 13 AND 14 WERE SPENT ON FORMING THEIR OWN OUTLINES AND GETTING THEM OKAYED. DAY FIFTEEN WAS A GOING AWAY PARTY FOR ME.( WE WATCHED One OF THE MOVIEíS WHOSE CLIP I HAD SHOWN IN ONE OF THE MEDIA EXAMPLES. ALL OF THE KIDS WANTED TO SEE THE WHOLE THING, SO WE HAD A DOUBLE PERIOD, ORDERED PIZZA, AND WATCHED AS MUCH OF IT AS POSSIBLE.